We educate and support the adults who care for young children in Southwest Ohio, the Miami Valley and Kentucky.

Parents

Infant Attachment

Are you worried that you are not giving your baby what she needs? Are you creating a bond with your baby?

Very young children are extremely dependent on their parents. Infants come into the world very much aware of their mother. Her scent, the sound of her voice and rhythm of her heart beat offer an infant a sense of familiarity and safety. Similarly a father’s consistent involvement with his baby reinforces this sense of security.

Your responses to baby’s cries sends a message to them that you can be depended upon, and your ability to comfort and meet your baby’s needs creates a bond. Successful bonding results in your baby acquiring a basic trust in the world as a safe place and in her own abilities to communicate needs. The connection a child has with their parent will influence their future relationships, impact their exploration and their willingness to take risks. The parent-child relationship is considered by many to be the most critical and influential relationship in a child’s life!

  1. Your baby knows you! Your face, your voice, your smell; he recognizes you and will respond. He may “talk” to you through coos and smiles, or follow you with his eyes. Smile, talk, sing and read to him often.
  2. Hold your baby. You won’t spoil her by cuddling or rocking her with a gentle motion.
  3. Respond to your baby’s cries to create trust. Learning the meaning of her cry will help you to more easily respond to and comfort her.
  4. Create routines. Try doing the same things in order and at certain times of the day, such as bathing, feeding and diapering. Your baby then knows what’s coming next.
  5. At 6 months, your baby is starting to repeat certain sounds like ma-ma and da-da. Repeat what he says; he enjoys copying you.
  6. Your baby may be upset when you attempt to leave. This behavior is normal. Be sure to say and wave bye-bye or create your own routine like blowing a kiss. Sneaking out just causes stress on your baby. Ask the person who is caring for her when you leave to comfort her with a favorite blanket or stuffed animal and words of support.